TOUR:

Choose For Yourselves Whom You Will Serve

God does not accept worship that attempts to mix Bible-based teachings with dogmas, traditions, or rituals of other religions. Jehovah is the God of truth, and he would never share his glory with false deities.

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About the tour:

The major lesson for us is that God does not accept worship that attempts to mix Bible-based teachings with dogmas, traditions, or rituals of other religions. There was no quibbling, no attempt to accommodate conflicting opinions, no giving place to interfaith ideas. Jehovah is no God of disjointed religious cults. No, he is the God of truth, and he would never share his glory with false deities.

Questions that will be answered on tour:
  • Who were “the gods that your forefathers served on the other side of the River“?
  • Who were “the gods that your forefathers served in Egypt“?
  • Who were “the gods of the Amorites“?
  • Why is that important for us today?
Jehovah plainly decreed that the temple in Jerusalem was the only center acceptable to him for celebrating annual festivals and offering sacrifices. (Deuteronomy 12:5; 2 Chronicles 7:12) So the Arad temple was constructed and used in defiance of God’s Law, perhaps during an era when alternative altars and rites were distracting many from pure worship. (Ezekiel 6:13)

Jehovah plainly decreed that the temple in Jerusalem was the only center acceptable to him for celebrating annual festivals and offering sacrifices. (Deuteronomy 12:5; 2 Chronicles 7:12) So the Arad temple was constructed and used in defiance of God’s Law, perhaps during an era when alternative altars and rites were distracting many from pure worship. (Ezekiel 6:13)

“House of God” Ostracon— a pottery fragment on which the divine name appears twice in Tetragrammaton form. This potsherd found in southern Israel was a letter addressed to a man named Eliashib and dates back to the second half of the seventh century B.C.E. “To my lord Eliashib: May Jehovah ask for your peace,” the letter begins. It ends: “He dwells in the house of Jehovah.” Many scholars believe that the temple referred to is the temple in Jerusalem, originally built in the time of Solomon.

“House of God” Ostracon— a pottery fragment on which the divine name appears twice in Tetragrammaton form. This potsherd found in southern Israel was a letter addressed to a man named Eliashib and dates back to the second half of the seventh century B.C.E. “To my lord Eliashib: May Jehovah ask for your peace,” the letter begins. It ends: “He dwells in the house of Jehovah.” Many scholars believe that the temple referred to is the temple in Jerusalem, originally built in the time of Solomon.

An unusual pottery stand about one foot tall vividly illustrating Philistine cultic ceremonies. The pedestal has five musicians, each playing a musical instrument—cymbals, double pipes, a stringed instrument, and a tambourine. This stand was found in Ashdod and dates from late 11th to early 10th century B.C.E.

An unusual pottery stand about one foot tall vividly illustrating Philistine cultic ceremonies. The pedestal has five musicians, each playing a musical instrument—cymbals, double pipes, a stringed instrument, and a tambourine. This stand was found in Ashdod and dates from late 11th to early 10th century B.C.E.

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